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Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s may have a common origin: study

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I am Barbara Redford, a professional journalist and writer with extensive experience in news reporting. I have been writing for The News Dept since 2019, covering topics related to health and wellness. My passion is to keep people informed about the latest developments in healthcare and the medical industry. With my articles, I strive to create awareness on various diseases while also highlighting their remedies or treatments.Aside from writing for The News Dept, I also conduct interviews with renowned doctors and medical practitioners who provide valuable insight into different illnesses or conditions. My articles are often highlighted by several leading health websites as well as magazines due to their quality of information and accuracy of facts.
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This is the hypothesis that emerged from a new study conducted by three scientists from the Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies of the National Research Council, according to which both pathologies are caused by the same neurodegenerative mechanism

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Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s may have a common origin. This is the hypothesis that emerged from a new study conducted by three researchers from the Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies of the National Research Council, according to which both pathologies are caused by the same neurodegenerative mechanism, called Nes – Neurodegenerative Elderly Syndrome (elder). , and would later differ. The results of the study, published in the pages of the specialized journal IBRO Neuroscience Reports, if confirmed, could pave the way for new approaches in the treatment and diagnosis of the two pathologies.

The study in detail

To conduct the study, the three researchers Daniele Caligiore, Flora Giocondo and Massimo Silvetti analyzed and compared the results that emerged from several Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s studies conducted in various fields, from genetics to neurophysiology.
They thus succeeded in tracing the two diseases back to the same neurodegenerative phenomenon, which would be characterized by three different progressive stages.

The three stages of the process

The first phase of NES, called the “seeding phase,” “begins many years before the onset of clinical symptoms and may include a progressive loss of neurons that produce norepinephrine and serotonin,” explains Caligiore, first author of the paper. “We propose that this initial damage may be mainly caused by the malfunction of a protein that is widespread in our body, alpha-synuclein.”
However, in the second phase, defined as the “compensation phase”, “dysfunctions of the neurons that synthesize the neuromodulator dopamine, which are found in two different parts of the brain, begin to appear: in the ventral tegmental area and in the substantia nigra. pars compacta”, he added Giocondo. “However, the obvious clinical signs are still silent, thanks to compensatory mechanisms that maintain the balance of the different concentrations of neuromodulators”. “The final stage is that of bifurcation, in which noradrenaline and serotonin are no longer able to compensate for dopaminergic dysfunctions, and in which NES becomes Alzheimer’s if the dopaminergic area most affected is the ventral tegmental area, or becomes Parkinson’s if the most affected area. area is the substantia nigra pars compacta,” he concluded.

Source: TG 24 Sky

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